City Safari

Thanks for sharing your work, Brooke!

This tour is possible thanks to Pittsburgh-based writer and illustrator Brooke Barker, whose first book, Sad Animal Facts, is a NY Times and LA Times best seller.

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This tour pairs Brooke's animal facts with Pittsburgh public art featuring the same creature. Let's get started!

Baby Kong | James Simon

Use link in map to explore this public art with Google Street View.

Baby Kong was the first installation that started the public art gallery on Gist Street. Now there are about a dozen or so pieces of art lining this short stretch of road in Uptown. In this scene, Baby Kong is peering out behind a wall. Could he be trying to hide is gray hip hair?

10th Street Geese | Tim Kaulen

Use link in map to explore this public art with Google Street View.

When a 10th Street Bridge renovation threatened to cover up the graffiti that adorned this river crossing, Pittsburgh residents signed a petition to save the "dino geese". With almost 1,000 signatures, artist Tim Kaulen was given permission to return in 2018 to refresh the painting that he first created back in 1993. 

Frogs Sculpture | Albert Guibara

Use link in map to explore this public art with Google Street View.

This sculpture is located in Firstside Park which was built with sustainability in mind. The park includes 2,500 tons of recycled concrete, and its walking path winds through beautiful landscaping, ornamental grasses, and deciduous trees.

Hilltop Waddle | James Simon

Use link in map to explore this public art with Google Street View.

This public art project includes 44 penguins scattered across the Hilltop neighborhoods of Allentown, Beltzhoover, and Knoxville. Simon chose penguins because these animals represent a strong sense of community... I mean, they're so loyal, they even propose with a pebble! 

The Night Garden | Jill Fisher and Katherine Young

Use link in map to explore this public art with Google Street View.

Artists Fisher and Young used color theory to create this nighttime garden scene, which Sheraden neighbors were particularly pleased about given their desire for a public art piece focused on visual beauty.

Horse Tamers  | Giuseppe Moretti

Use link in map to explore this public art with Google Street View.

These two bronze sculptures that mark the entrance to Highland Park at Stanton Avenue were constructed in 1900. The horse tamers reflect the theme of humans trying to control the power of nature. Is it possible these sculptures also depict two humans trying to floss their horses' teeth?

MON, AL, & OH: The Three That Got Away | Chris & Elizabeth Siefert

Use link in map to explore this public art with Google Street View.

This art piece located outside the Children's Museum of Pittsburgh was a collaborative father-daughter effort. The three fish are named after the three rivers of Pittsburgh: the Monongahela, the Allegheny, and the Ohio. The next time you visit and say hello to these fish by name, cut them a break if they don't remember yours. This museum gets a lot of visitors!

LAST STOP / GRAND FINALE

Randyland | Randy

Use link in map to explore this public art with Google Street View.

Can you find all the different animals in this colorful scene? Once you've found them all, check out Sad Animal Facts website and Instagram account to search for facts about the animals you discovered at Randyland.

Thanks for going on the City Safari!

Don't forget to share this tour with all the animal lovers in your life.

Also, check out Street Lark's virtual scavenger hunt if you haven't already!

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